Romantic Rose Bouquets: Advice and Inspiration

Hailed as the most romantic of flowers, roses would be the perfect choice for your bridal bouquet. Here’s everything you need to know…


It’s easy to see why roses are one of the most popular wedding flowers. Not only do they look stunning at any time of year, they also symbolise love, passion and romance – pretty much everything you could wish for on your wedding day!

Inspired to include these flowers in your bridal look? We spoke to two expert florists to find out everything you need to know about rose bouquets.

Rose bouquets

Image credits: Kat Forsyth Photography

When are roses in season?

Another reason why roses are so popular for bridal bouquets is that they are pretty much always in season, which makes them very easy for your florist to source.

We spoke to Michaella Wood from House of Blooms to find out more: “A great thing about roses is that most varieties are available all year round - there are literally hundreds of types with so many different stem lengths and colours that would complement any colour scheme.

"In terms of cost, the mainstream roses that are produced and grown in large quantities are generally cheaper in price."

Pink rose bouquet

Image credits: Flowers by House of Blooms; Image by Oliver Photography

What do roses symbolise?

Roses are the epitome of love, although the various colours do have further meanings - with red being the most passionate of course.

“Roses are the ultimate romantic flower,” explains Louise, owner of Louise Avery Flowers. “The language of flowers tells us that red roses symbolise passion, white roses mean innocence whilst pink roses represent admiration, grace, gladness and joy – an ideal combination of emotions for a wedding.”

If you’re going for a more vibrant bouquet of yellow and orange roses, you’ll also be pleased to hear that yellow roses symbolise care and friendship, whilst orange roses bring passion and energy.

Take a look at our guide to wedding flower meanings if you want to find out what other types of blooms symbolise. 

Winter rose bouquet

Image credit: Louise Avery Flowers

What should I consider when choosing a rose bouquet?

“The texture, colour, flower head size and scent are all factors to consider when choosing roses for your bridal bouquet,” suggests Michaella. “Your florist will help you find the perfect option to complement your colour scheme, as well as the look and feel of your wedding day”.

Rustic bridal bouquet

Image credit: House of Blooms

As Michaella explains, the theme and style of your day and your wedding dress should determine which type of rose you go for. For example, if you’re inspired to have a vintage bridal bouquet then amnesia roses would be perfect, as the faded purple look gives a dreamy, old-fashioned vibe. 

Vintage rose bouquet

Image credits: Flowers by The Flower Bird; Image by Miss Gen Photography

Michaella also has tips for brides going for a classic wedding look: “A hand tied bouquet made up of one rose type, such as the garden variety, creates a really romantic look.

“Alternatively, using additional flowers and accents as fillers alongside your roses can highlight your colour scheme in a way that's not too overpowering.”

Pink and red rose bouquet

Image credits: Flowers by Vintage Floral Design Co; Photo by Kat Forsyth Photography


When it comes to choosing a type of rose for your bouquet, you’ll be absolutely amazed at the versatility and how much choice there is.

“The different types of roses all give different shapes and textures,” says Michaella. “There are also multi-shade varieties, such as David Austin roses (which are produced by specialist growers) and various garden rose types - these are multi-layered and often look more beautiful the longer you have them. For these type of roses, your florist will probably order them at least a few days before your wedding to give them time to open up to their full, gorgeous potential."

As mentioned before, amnesia roses would be perfect for a vintage style wedding. Eye catching roses in soft shades of pink and red would look lovely at a summer wedding - such as the two toned ‘Madame A. Meilland’, the classically shaped ‘Queen Elizabeth’ and the peony-esque David Austin Rose.

Mixed rose bouquet

Image credit: Moutan


Whatever your colour scheme and no matter what time of year you’re tying the knot, there’s a rose colour to suit your big day.

“The rose family is huge. It offers an unbelievably large range of colours and one of the biggest shade spectrums in the flower world,” says Louise. “Roses in soft champagne, oyster, apricot and peach shades can be sourced, as well as deep wine reds and almost every hue of pink.”

Garden rose bouquet

Image credit: Moutan

“From a florist's point of view, it is important to see what colour scheme has been chosen by the bride for her bridesmaids and décor,” explains Jenny, the owner of Flower Barn. “This is so that we can colour match the appropriate rose for your wedding.

“Vibrant Aqua roses are perfect for highlighting colour schemes with accents of pink – in this bouquet I used them as the focal flower as they draw the eye in with their stunning pink petals.”

Aqua rose bouquet

If you're looking for summer wedding flower ideas, then a bouquet filled with roses in pastel shades of cream and pink would fit right in with the season thanks to its soft, pastel tones. Fancy something a bit more dramatic for an autumn or winter wedding? A passionate posy of red roses would be a show stopping accompaniment to your dress.

Red rose bouquets

Image credits: Flowers by Louise Avery Flowers; Image by Hayley Bray Photography


Mixing different rose sizes in your bouquet is a great way to add more depth and texture to it. Spray roses, which are smaller than their counterparts, would be excellent fillers for a bouquet filled with bigger roses or other flowers – this would be also be a great wedding budget hack as they are fairly cheap to buy. 

Louise explains more about different rose sizes and what to consider: “Roses are available as large, medium or small flower heads, plus there are the beautiful and delicate miniature spray roses of course. Tighter roses are better for a more formal look, whilst open roses are (literally) more relaxed and informal.”

Purple and ivory rose bouquet

Image credit: Louise Avery Flowers

“The weight of your bouquet should also be a consideration,” continues Louise. “Your florist should advise you that anyone who opts for large rose bouquets may find that they can be quite heavy to hold. Roses have woody stems and can be quite heavy in a large quantity, especially the large head varieties.”

Rustic rose bouquet

Image credit: Jennifer Sinclair Photography


“Fragrance is mostly, though not exclusively, found in English garden roses,” explains Louise. “There is nothing quite like the scent of a rose to add a third dimension to your bridal bouquet.”

If you’re not keen on a strong rose scent, opt for the smaller garden ones, rambling roses or shrub roses instead.

Fragrant rose bouquets

Image credit: Lilac and Willow

What other flowers can I include in my rose bouquet?

Because roses are incredibly versatile when it comes to size and colour, there are so many floral combinations you could include in your bouquet.

Louise recommends looking for seasonal wedding flowers when adding other elements to rose bouquets: “Celebrate the time of year by adding seasonal flowers, herbs and foliage - such as pussy-willow and katkins in the spring or seed pods and berries for an autumn wedding.” 

Another popular type of wedding flower which would look gorgeous amongst an arrangement of roses would be peonies, which are mostly available in the summer months. Take a look at our guide to peony bouquets for more inspiration on how to combine the two.

Peony and rose bouquets

Image credit: House of Blooms

How do I keep my rose bouquet in good condition?

Once you’ve picked out the perfect rose bouquet, you’ll need to know how to store and take care of it - Michaella explains: “Once your florist delivers your rose bouquet, they will tell you how to keep it fresh. It's best to keep it in a cool room if possible and in water as well, without getting any ribbon wet.

“On the big day once you're ready to hold your bouquet, dab off the stems with a tea towel so you don't get water on your dress. As long as your florist has properly conditioned and fed the flowers before your wedding, your bouquet should easily last all day.”

Embellished rose bouquet

Image credit: Interflora

For more inspiration on different styles of rose bouquets and to brush up on your terminology, check out our guide to wedding bouquet styles.


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